Announcements

Job offersmore »

Tweeting Growers

Last commentsmore »

Top 5 - yesterday

Top 5 - last week

Top 5 - last month

Exchange ratesmore »




Scientists genetically engineer the world’s first blue chrysanthemum

True blue flowers are a rarity in nature—they occur only in select species like morning glories and delphiniums. Now, researchers have created a genuinely blue chrysanthemum by adding two genes to the normally pink or reddish flower. The advance could be applied to other species—and it may mean that florists wanting to hawk blooms of blue will no longer have to dye them.

“This [advance] is of great impact,” says Toru Nakayama, a plant biochemist at Tohoku University in Sendai, Japan, who was not involved with the work. There are several popular commercial species for which no true blue varieties exist, he notes.

We all think we’ve seen blue flowers before. And in some cases, it’s true. But according to the Royal Horticultural Society’s color scale—the gold standard for flowers—most “blues” are really violet or purple. Florists and gardeners are forever on the lookout for new colors and varieties of plants, however, but making popular ornamental and cut flowers, like roses, vibrant blue has proved quite difficult. “We’ve all been trying to do this for a long time and it’s never worked perfectly,” says Thomas Colquhoun, a plant biotechnologist at the University of Florida in Gainesville who was not involved with the work.

True blue requires complex chemistry. Anthocyanins—pigment molecules in the petals, stem, and fruit—consist of rings that cause a flower to turn red, purple, or blue, depending on what sugars or other groups of atoms are attached. Conditions inside the plant cell also matter. So just transplanting an anthocyanin from a blue flower like a delphinium didn’t really work.

Read more at Science

Publication date: 8/7/2017

 


 

Other news in this sector:

10/17/2017 Interplant introduces new roses with ruffled petals
10/16/2017 UK: RHS Wisley awards for Year of the Zinnia varieties
10/13/2017 How Virtual Reality can enhance breeding
10/13/2017 Where does ilex come from?
10/12/2017 Breeding salt-tolerant plants
10/12/2017 Dümmen Orange teams up with Esmeralda Breeding
10/11/2017 US (NC): Bailey Nurseries scoops awards with Screaming Neon Red
10/11/2017 Greffe de Vie rose is now named Belles Rives
10/11/2017 "Diversification is to become more important"
10/6/2017 Chinese market more important to Danish breeder Roses Forever
10/6/2017 India: The men of pitch-perfect roses
10/5/2017 In search of a transportation proof Poinsettia
10/4/2017 The long journey of a rose, from seedling to commercial product
10/4/2017 Bailey expands breeding operations, announces Bailey Innovations
10/4/2017 Horace McFarland named father of the ‘American Rose Society’
10/4/2017 PlantPaper expands in Turkey
9/29/2017 Ball releases new Ingenuity catalog
9/25/2017 Frans-Peter Dechering Commercial Director at Schoneveld Breeding
9/20/2017 RNA discovery could help boost plant heat, drought tolerance
9/20/2017 Orchid gives up the secrets of its success

 

Leave a comment: (max. 500 characters)

  1. All comments which are not related to the article contents will be removed.
  2. All comments with non-related commercial content, will be removed.
  3. All comments with offensive language, will be removed.




  Display email address

  new code