Announcements

Job offersmore »

Tweeting Growers

Last commentsmore »

Top 5 - yesterday

  • No news has been published yesterday.

Top 5 - last week

Top 5 - last month

Exchange ratesmore »




Scientists genetically engineer the world’s first blue chrysanthemum

True blue flowers are a rarity in nature—they occur only in select species like morning glories and delphiniums. Now, researchers have created a genuinely blue chrysanthemum by adding two genes to the normally pink or reddish flower. The advance could be applied to other species—and it may mean that florists wanting to hawk blooms of blue will no longer have to dye them.

“This [advance] is of great impact,” says Toru Nakayama, a plant biochemist at Tohoku University in Sendai, Japan, who was not involved with the work. There are several popular commercial species for which no true blue varieties exist, he notes.

We all think we’ve seen blue flowers before. And in some cases, it’s true. But according to the Royal Horticultural Society’s color scale—the gold standard for flowers—most “blues” are really violet or purple. Florists and gardeners are forever on the lookout for new colors and varieties of plants, however, but making popular ornamental and cut flowers, like roses, vibrant blue has proved quite difficult. “We’ve all been trying to do this for a long time and it’s never worked perfectly,” says Thomas Colquhoun, a plant biotechnologist at the University of Florida in Gainesville who was not involved with the work.

True blue requires complex chemistry. Anthocyanins—pigment molecules in the petals, stem, and fruit—consist of rings that cause a flower to turn red, purple, or blue, depending on what sugars or other groups of atoms are attached. Conditions inside the plant cell also matter. So just transplanting an anthocyanin from a blue flower like a delphinium didn’t really work.

Read more at Science

Publication date: 8/7/2017

 


 

Other news in this sector:

12/14/2017 Celebrating the South Australian rose
12/12/2017 Behind the scenes at Dümmen Orange's production facilities in Guatemala
12/12/2017 Danziger “Novemberfest – Bedding Open Days” come to an end
12/12/2017 Kenya: Scientists call for adoption of GM crops to fight emerging pests
12/11/2017 Selecta one trial on insect-friendly plants
12/11/2017 US: Reinventing the poinsettia
12/7/2017 US: 'Bible of propagation texts' gets update
12/5/2017 New Zealand: Clean sweep for Glenavon Roses in Rose Trial
12/1/2017 "Supporting innovation in the plant sector with IP rights"
11/30/2017 Finally: the next big red?
11/29/2017 International interest for new series of mini roses
11/24/2017 US: Invincibelle Wee White hydrangea wins Green Thumb Award
11/23/2017 US: New high-stem Calibrachoas to color Mother's Day 2018
11/22/2017 Australian Rose Award for Mary Frick
11/20/2017 Europe and China sign cooperation agreement on plant variety rights
11/16/2017 A second chance for limonium hybrids
11/15/2017 New Zealand: Roses to shine at international rose trials
11/14/2017 Brandkamp taps into bi-colored trend with new chrysanthemums
11/14/2017 One step closer to crops with twice the yield
11/10/2017 Artificial seeds: Even better than the real thing?

 

Leave a comment: (max. 500 characters)

  1. All comments which are not related to the article contents will be removed.
  2. All comments with non-related commercial content, will be removed.
  3. All comments with offensive language, will be removed.




  Display email address

  new code