Announcements

Job offersmore »

Tweeting Growers

Last commentsmore »

Top 5 - yesterday

  • No news has been published yesterday.

Top 5 - last week

Top 5 - last month

Exchange ratesmore »




Effect of plant species, fertilizer on soilless root substrate pH

The objective of this study was to determine how plant species, fertilizer potential acidity/basicity rating (PABR), and fertilizer concentration affect root substrate pH. Three experiments were conducted.

In the first experiment, 13 herbaceous species were grown in a root substrate of three sphagnum peatmoss: one perlite (v/v) with deionized water and a neutral fertilizer (NF) with a PABR of 0 for 78 days to determine species relationships to substrate pH. The decrease in substrate pH ranged from 0.14 to 2.45 units, depending on species.

In the second experiment, four of the 13 species from the previous trial representing the range of pH suppression were grown under similar growth conditions as the first experiment for 70 days. Substrate pH was lowered in the range of 0.47 to 2.72 units.

In the third experiment, three fertilizers with PABRs of 150 kg·t−1 CaCO3 equivalent alkalinity, 0 neutral, and 193 kg·t−1 CaCO3 equivalent acidity were applied in a factorial design at 100 and 200 mg·L−1 N at each irrigation to kalanchoe (the species with the greatest pH suppression from the previous experiments) for 56 days.

When applied at the lower fertilizer rate (100 mg·L−1 N), the PABRs resulted in the final substrate pH levels of 4.68, 5.60, and 6.11 for the acidic fertilizer (AF), NF, and basic fertilizer (BF), respectively. At the high fertilizer rate (200 mg·L−1 N), substrate pH declined continuously to 3.97, 4.03, and 4.92 for the AF, NF, and BF, respectively.

Expression of PABR depended on the balance between the abiotic (chemical) effect of the fertilizers vs. the biotic (physiological) effects of the fertilizers on microbes and plants. The PABR was best expressed when the fertilizer supply was just adequate or lower indicating a closer connection to the biotic effect.

Access the full study at HortScience

Publication date: 1/5/2017

 


 

Other news in this sector:

12/7/2017 US (OR): Researchers model optimal amount of rainfall for plants
12/1/2017 "Bio-fertilization works in pelargonium"
11/24/2017 AkzoNobel breaks ground for European micronutrients expansion project
11/20/2017 Floriculture nutrition: The latest in phosphorus fertility
11/17/2017 Growth response of herbaceous ornamentals to phosphorus fertilization
10/24/2017 CAN (ON): Vineland contributes soil knowledge to tree-planting effort
9/27/2017 US: Extended shelf life for Actinovate biological fungicides
9/13/2017 Plant-Prod introduces Duo-Tote
9/11/2017 US: Sun Gro, Proven Winners form sales & distribution partnership
8/28/2017 US: "Benefits from production to end consumer"
8/21/2017 Turkish investor starts organic fertiliser production in Zambia
8/11/2017 10 must-know growing media facts
8/8/2017 The challenges of fertilizing poinsettias
7/19/2017 NL: "Ekote makes additional fertilizing during the growth process unnecessary"
7/14/2017 US: RainSoil debuts natural silicon-based liquid soil amendment
7/12/2017 Fertilizing mums with water soluble fertilizer
7/7/2017 Plant-Prod to showcase new Duo-Tote at Cultivate’17
6/7/2017 Earth Alive's Soil Activator registered in Ukraine
6/7/2017 Mycorrhizae and plants make great allies
6/6/2017 US: Nutrient, pH, alkalinity, and ionic property levels in basins

 

Leave a comment: (max. 500 characters)

  1. All comments which are not related to the article contents will be removed.
  2. All comments with non-related commercial content, will be removed.
  3. All comments with offensive language, will be removed.




  Display email address

  new code