Announcements

Job offersmore »

Tweeting Growers

Last commentsmore »

Top 5 - yesterday

Top 5 - last week

Top 5 - last month

Exchange ratesmore »




U.S. lists Rusty Patched Bumblebee as endangered species

The rusty patched bumble bee, a prized but vanishing pollinator once familiar to much of North America, was listed on Tuesday as an endangered species, becoming the first wild bee in the continental United States to gain such federal protection.

One of several species facing sharp declines, the bumble bee known to scientists as Bombus affinis has plunged nearly 90 percent in abundance and distribution since the late 1990s, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

The agency listed the insect after determining it to be in danger of extinction across all or portions of its range, attributing its decline to a mix of factors, including disease, pesticides, climate change and habitat loss.

Named for the conspicuous reddish blotch on its abdomen, the rusty patched bumble bee once flourished across 28 states, primarily in the upper Midwest and Northeast -- from South Dakota to Connecticut -- and in the Canadian provinces of Ontario and Quebec.

Today, only a few small, scattered populations remain in 13 states and Ontario, the Fish and Wildlife Service said.

The agency in September listed seven varieties of yellow-faced, or masked, bees in Hawaii as endangered. But Bombus affinis is the first bumble bee species to given that status, and the first wild bee of any kind to be listed in the Lower 48 states.

The decision drew praise from environmentalists but criticism from the nonprofit American Farm Bureau Federation, which acknowledged the role bees play in pollinating crops but contended the listing could lead to costly regulation of land or chemical use.

"I think we can do better in the private sector, where landowners working collaboratively can come up with protection for these species without intervention and bureaucratic red tape of the federal government," said Ryan Yates, the group's director of congressional relations to ABC News.

Source: Reuters - ABC News

Publication date: 1/11/2017

 


 

Other news in this sector:

1/17/2017 What's the biggest reason to reduce chemical crop protection?
1/13/2017 "Future of automation in weed control is very promising”
1/11/2017 US: Survival of insect and mite pests in empty greenhouses during winter
1/5/2017 Scouting for diseases and environmental monitoring
1/4/2017 Canada: Presidio Fungicide registered for greenhouse ornamentals
1/2/2017 Dramm receives the 100,000 pulsFOG
1/2/2017 Koppert introduces new functional labels and look
12/23/2016 Mass insect migrations in UK skies
12/23/2016 Cryptobug produces good results against mealy bug
12/23/2016 Varroa mites jump from flowers to honeybees
12/22/2016 US (KS): Rose rosette disease confirmed in Ellis County
12/21/2016 Two SIVAL Innovation Award nominations for Biobest
12/21/2016 US (MN): Flower grower replaces pesticides with beneficials
12/21/2016 Yellow, blue or patterned, which roller trap should you pick?
12/20/2016 The nuts and bolts of scouting
12/20/2016 On the frontline of biosecurity in Australia
12/19/2016 Extra potential for the improvement of crop protection
12/15/2016 Stringent rules for better protection from plant pests
12/15/2016 UC demonstrates benefits of a scouting program for insects and mites
12/15/2016 New $4m effort aims to stop death spiral of honeybees

 

Leave a comment: (max. 500 characters)

  1. All comments which are not related to the article contents will be removed.
  2. All comments with non-related commercial content, will be removed.
  3. All comments with offensive language, will be removed.




  Display email address

  new code