Job offersmore »

Tweeting Growers

Last commentsmore »

Top 5 - yesterday

  • No news has been published yesterday.

Top 5 - last week

Top 5 - last month

Exchange ratesmore »

U.S. lists Rusty Patched Bumblebee as endangered species

The rusty patched bumble bee, a prized but vanishing pollinator once familiar to much of North America, was listed on Tuesday as an endangered species, becoming the first wild bee in the continental United States to gain such federal protection.

One of several species facing sharp declines, the bumble bee known to scientists as Bombus affinis has plunged nearly 90 percent in abundance and distribution since the late 1990s, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

The agency listed the insect after determining it to be in danger of extinction across all or portions of its range, attributing its decline to a mix of factors, including disease, pesticides, climate change and habitat loss.

Named for the conspicuous reddish blotch on its abdomen, the rusty patched bumble bee once flourished across 28 states, primarily in the upper Midwest and Northeast -- from South Dakota to Connecticut -- and in the Canadian provinces of Ontario and Quebec.

Today, only a few small, scattered populations remain in 13 states and Ontario, the Fish and Wildlife Service said.

The agency in September listed seven varieties of yellow-faced, or masked, bees in Hawaii as endangered. But Bombus affinis is the first bumble bee species to given that status, and the first wild bee of any kind to be listed in the Lower 48 states.

The decision drew praise from environmentalists but criticism from the nonprofit American Farm Bureau Federation, which acknowledged the role bees play in pollinating crops but contended the listing could lead to costly regulation of land or chemical use.

"I think we can do better in the private sector, where landowners working collaboratively can come up with protection for these species without intervention and bureaucratic red tape of the federal government," said Ryan Yates, the group's director of congressional relations to ABC News.

Source: Reuters - ABC News

Publication date: 1/11/2017



Other news in this sector:

3/19/2018 Bioline expands Amblyseius andersoni line with new sachet format
3/16/2018 Can you control Eclipta?
3/14/2018 "We'll never stop using NatuGro"
3/14/2018 Protecting pollinators: What role can the greenhouse industry play?
3/14/2018 Why the conservation of orchids is no simple matter
3/12/2018 CAN (ON): IPM survey helps focus research and products for growers
3/9/2018 "We grow the best and most beautiful roses thanks to IPM"
3/9/2018 The birds and the bees... and the bats and monkeys
3/7/2018 US: Syngenta's Segovis fungicide now available in California, New York
3/2/2018 NL: Can the TVX virus be removed from crates?
3/1/2018 New Zealand: Ban lifted on movement of myrtle rust plants in Taranaki
2/27/2018 US (MI): "Be on the lookout for spider mites and broad mites"
2/27/2018 US: Rhizoctonia infection in high density fern production
2/26/2018 "Preventative spray applications may do more harm than good"
2/22/2018 Spain: New outbreak of Xylella Fastidiosa detected in Alicante
2/22/2018 "Donít let viruses, foliar nematodes or downy mildew ruin your crop"
2/21/2018 Powdery mildew spores are spread with air movement
2/21/2018 First report of Phytophthora tentaculata affecting Santolina in the UK
2/20/2018 ToCV outbreak in the Netherlands
2/20/2018 US: EPA settles with Amazon for distributions of illegal pesticides


Leave a comment: (max. 500 characters)

  1. All comments which are not related to the article contents will be removed.
  2. All comments with non-related commercial content, will be removed.
  3. All comments with offensive language, will be removed.

  Display email address

  new code