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How do you develop biological pesticides?

Working with partners from the EU BIOCOMES project, Wageningen University & Research has organised a workshop from 17 to 19 January about successfully developing biological pesticides using micro-organisms (bacteria, fungi, nematodes). The workshop will be held at the German biological crop protection company e-nema.

The workshop is aimed at young researchers working in the field of biological pest control through their studies and/or research (including PhD research). It attracted a great deal of interest. Eighteen candidates were eventually selected on the basis of their scientific background and experience. The participants come from the Netherlands, Spain, Germany, Switzerland, Belgium, Lithuania, Rumania, Poland, Slovenia, Austria, Columbia, Bangladesh and China.

The workshop deals with relevant themes such as the role of ‘omics’ in biological pest control and the mass production and downstreaming of entomopathogenic nematodes and micro-organisms. On a different note, participants will learn about the ins and outs of registering biological pest control products. The so-called Select Biocontrol approach at Wageningen University & Research also features on the agenda: this is a step-by-step plan for testing the suitability of micro-organisms as commercial biological pesticides for controlling fungal and bacterial diseases, and pest insects.

The three-day programme includes a trip to the facilities of e-nema and Bayer Crop Science Biologics in Germany.

Source: Wageningen University & Research

Publication date: 1/24/2017

 


 

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Comments:


biologial pest controll
Hubert, Isselburg, Germany - 1/25/2017 8:57:15 PM


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