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How to recognize and prevent Pythium

Of all the root rot pathogens, Pythium is the most common problem that growers experience. Pythium consists of approximately 125 different species, not all of which are plant pathogens, and is found in almost every environment.

Most pathogenic Pythium species have a large host range across most greenhouse and nursery crops. It can be introduced from infected plugs and other plant material that comes into the greenhouse, but it also hibernates in soil residues on the floor and inside used pots, benches, hoses, walkways, soil floors, potting benches, potting machines, etc. It can also be found in ponds, streams and outdoor soil, so surface water sources and dust that comes into the greenhouse can introduce Pythium.

Read more at the PRO-MIX website.

Publication date: 2/16/2017

 


 

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