Plazoleta uses Potveer machine to process statice flowers

Demand for quality introduces automation to Colombian industry

Automation in South America is still in its infancy. Sorting and bunching of flowers, for example, is still being done manually at many farms and achieving a consistent bunch is a challenge. The advantages and necessity of automating this post harvest process is recognized but the decision to invest in a machine is not easily made as there are not that many references. Fortunately, some growers decide to start using these processing machines and are spreading positive word of mouth.

Colombian flower grower Plazoleta, for example, started to process its statice flowers automatically with a machine from Potveer about five months ago and their clients seemed to be pleased with the consistency of their bunches. On top of that, they also see an increase in productivity.


Camilo Bazzani and Pablo Bazzani in front of their new processing machine from Potveer.

More consistent
The Potveer machine cuts, sorts and bunches the statice. "As it is all done automatically, it is being done more accurate, which in turn results in a more consistent bunch of flowers", says Camilo Bazzani of La Plazoleta.

More efficient
Next to delivering a more consistent bunch, it also enables La Plazoleta to work more efficient. "By using this machine 50 bunches are made per worker per day and it therefore makes the process more and more efficient. We do not want our workers to work over 8 hours and before using this machine, not every worker could achieve 50 bunches per day", says Camilo.

Less claims
Camilo is already very pleased with the new machine. "We compared the claims to last year and we received considerably less claims since we are using this machine."

During our visit at the farm, we had the opportunity to see the machine in real life, below the process explained in pictures:


Flowers are put on the conveyor belt by bulk without any previous grading selection


Using length lines on the conveyor belt, Flowers are graded depending on their quality characteristics (flowers that don't fit quality standards are taken out). Then, each stem is pre-cut to be bunched.


Following the grading lines, stems are gathered to make bunches, either by ten or by five depending on varieties and customer needs.



Bunches are put on the bundling line to be cut to their final length and bundled to be sleeved.



For more information:
La Plazoleta
Camilo Bazzani
Email: cbazzani@laplazoleta.com
www.laplazoleta.com

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